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historywars:

British marines in Gallipolli


This should be “British marines on the road to Gallipoli” because the fort behind them is in Tenedos, an island near Gallipoli.

historywars:

British marines in Gallipolli

This should be “British marines on the road to Gallipoli” because the fort behind them is in Tenedos, an island near Gallipoli.

And once the storm is over you won’t remember how you made it through, how you managed to survive. You won’t even be sure, in fact, whether the storm is really over. But one thing is certain. When you come out of the storm you won’t be the same person who walked in. That’s what this storm’s all about.
Haruki Murakami (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)
waandering:

Wow.

waandering:

Wow.

bublyful:

magic | Tumblr on We Heart It.

bublyful:

magic | Tumblr on We Heart It.

Some people feel the rain. Others just get wet.
Bob Marley (via psych-facts)
banjosandbogs:

The Fog!

The view!

banjosandbogs:

The Fog!

The view!

goabroadd:

imcomingcolorado:

raggedglory:

leave the christmas trees in the forests, you cretins…

endlessme:

One Photo, 126 Frames, 2 Billion Leaves, 247 Feet

Cloaked in the snows of California’s Sierra Nevada, the 3,200-year-old giant sequoia called the President rises 247 feet. Two other sequoias have wider trunks, but none has a larger crown, say the scientists who climbed it. The figure at top seems taller than the other climbers because he’s standing forward on one of the great limbs.

have this poster in my dorm room it is rad as fuck

samez! 

condenasttraveler:

Agritourism in the Pacific Northwest “Harvest Swoon” (March 2013). Photo by Peter Frank Edwards

condenasttraveler:

Agritourism in the Pacific Northwest “Harvest Swoon” (March 2013). Photo by Peter Frank Edwards

What’s this nonsense with the axes?
Me

odditiesoflife:

The Black Rose of Turkey

Turkish Halfeti Roses are incredibly rare. They are shaped just like regular roses, but their color sets them apart. These roses are so black, you’d think someone spray-painted them. But that’s actually their natural color.

Although they appear perfectly black, they’re actually a very deep crimson color. These flowers are seasonal – they only grow during the summer in small number, and only in the tiny Turkish village of Halfeti. Thanks to the unique soil conditions of the region, and the pH levels of the groundwater (that seeps in from the river Euphrates), the roses take on a devilish hue. They bloom dark red during the spring and fade to black during the summer months.

The local Turks seem to enjoy a love-hate relationship with these rare blossoms. They consider the flowers to be symbols of mystery, hope and passion, and also death and bad news.

Seeing a black rose in full bloom is a once-in-a-lifetime sort of thing. Don’t miss it if you ever happen to be in Turkey during the summer.

(via Oddity Central)